GP-4L RADIO/FLASHLIGHT
This is a long page with at least 25 images on it; dial-up users please allow for plenty of load time.
You have no chance to survive make your time.



GP-4L Radio/Flashlight, retail $22.00 (www.countycomm.com...)
Manufactured by Degen Co. (http://www.kaitousa.com/)
Last updated 09-08-13





This is a pocket transistor radio that has AM, FM, and two shortwave bands, a digital alarm clock, and (most importantly with regards to this website) an LED flashlight, all rolled into one handy-dandy package.

With regards to this product, I'll focus most of my attention on the LED flashlight, because that's my job. But I'll still explain the other aspects of this product.

The case is made of grey plastic, with a brushed aluminum front. So it is very nice to look at even when you're not using it, and you need not hide it when guests come over to your residence.


 SIZE



To use this radio, feed it first (see directly below), and then you'll be ready to rock.

To use the flashlight, slide the switch on the left side of the radio's body forward (toward the antenna, headphone jack, and LED). To turn the flashlight off, slide the same switch back toward you, so it is in the center position. Do not slide it all the way back, or else the radio will turn on. There is no momentary or signalling mode, so please do not look for or expect to find one.


This is a photograph showing how the product might be used as a flashlight.

To use the radio, slide the switch on the left hand side of the radio's body backward (toward you). Select the band you want (FM, AM (MW), SW1, or SW2) by sliding the switch above the one you just used until the radio band you want is on. Tune to the station you want by turning the small wheel on the right hand side of the radio's body and looking at the LCD display to see when the frequency is what you want. Turn the small wheel below the tuning wheel to adjust the sound volume as you see fit.

For AM (MW) stations, rotate the radio itself until the best reception is obtained. Otherwise, extend the whip antenna and point around until the best reception is obtained.

To use the included earphones, turn the radio volume down (so you don't get an unpleasant surprise when you put the earbuds in your ears), plug the plug on the end of the earphone cord into the receptacle for it on the top of the radio next to the LED, put the earbuds in your ears, and adjust the volume as you see fit. The radio's internal speaker is disconnected when you plug the earphones in, so as not to disturb others around you.

To set the time on the clock, turn the radio so the display faces you, feel for the topmost button on the lower left of the back of the radio, hold that button down, change the hour by pressing and then releasing the topmost button on the lower right of the back of the radio, and change the minute by pressing and releasing the bottommost button on the lower right of the radio. Pressing and releasing the hour or minute buttons advances the digit by 1 hour or 1 minute. Holding down the button(s) causes the numbers in the display to advance at approximately two times per second. Release the "time set" button when you are finished.

To set the alarm time, feel for the bottommost button on the lower left of the back of the radio, hold that button down, change the hour by pressing and then releasing the topmost button on the lower right of the back of the radio, and change the minute by pressing and releasing the bottommost button on the lower right of the radio. Pressing and releasing the hour or minute buttons advances the digit by 1 hour or 1 minute. Holding down the button(s) causes the numbers in the display to advance at approximately two times per second. Release the "al set on/off" button when you are finished.

To turn the alarm on and off, just press the "al set on/off" on the back of the radio.
(Edit 03-03-05) The alarm is the radio itself; you'll want to be sure it's tuned to a strong station and the volume is reasonably loud (to wake you up) before you anticipate using the alarm.



To change the batteries in this product, look on the lower right hand side of the radio's body for a small door. Slide it downward, and then remove it. Throw it in the can, and flu...er...don't flush it away - set it aside. Remove the two used AA cells from the radio, and dispose of or recycle them as you see fit. Don't throw them in the john...dispose of them in some other manner (like in a wastepaperbasket or a dipsty-dumpster) or recycle them.

Insert two new AA cells in the chambers for them, placing the cells in so the one closest to the bottom of the radio goes in flat-end (-) negative first, and the other cell button-end (+) positive first.

While pressing in slightly on the cells, slide the battery door back on, so the depressed areas on its sides fit the raised areas on the edges of the battery compartment on the radio's body.

Battery life is advertised to be 40 hours for the LED, and 70 hours for the radio, with the volume set to 40% of maximum.
One user reported getting 140 hours on the radio with a set of lithium AA cells (Energizer L91 or equivalent); however I have not confirmed this for myself. Nick at Countycomm also reported getting 100 hours on the radio using Kirkland alkaline AA cells.

Current consumption was measured at 64.2mA on an FM station with the radio volume all the way up, and 24.2mA for the LED.




This is a photograph of the back of the unit, showing the buttons and the switch labelling.

Because this is a transistor radio and not a stand-alone flashlight meant to be thrashed and abused, I won't try to drown it in the toilet, smash it against a concrete sidewalk, throw it against a wall, stomp on it, sit down hard on it, or otherwise abuse it. So this portion of the web page will be more bare than this section of the web page on a page about a flashlight.

The radio is not water-resistant, but you can buy a plastic case for it for $1.00 that the radio fits very nicely into, that will make the radio weather-resistant and splash-resistant at minimum.



There appears to be a DC-DC inverter to boost the battery voltage of 3.0 volts to the 3.6 to 3.8 volts that the white LED needs. Current consumption is 24.2mA on that white LED.


In this photograph, the radio is tuned to 101.5MHz KPLZ FM (a Seattle-area radio station).
Note that the tuning indicator is lighted.

This is a LCD (liquid crystal display) that shows what frequency the radio is tuned to, and shows the time (in 12 hr, AM/PM format) when the radio is turned off. It uses very, very, very little power, so you do not need to be concerned in the least bit about it being on all the time.



Beam photograph at ~12".
Measures 7,290mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the white LED in this radio.


Spectrographic analysis
Same as above; newer spectrometer software & settings used.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the red "tuned" LED in this radio.

Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the white LED in this radio; newest (01-13-13) spectrometer software settings used.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the white LED in this radio; newest (01-13-13) spectrometer software settings used. Spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 455nm and 465nm to pinpoint native emission peak wavelength, which is 457.170nm.

The raw spectrometer data (tab-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/43/gp4l-f.txt


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the red "tuning" LED in this radio; newest (01-13-13) spectrometer software settings used.


Spectrographic analysis
Spectrographic analysis of the red "tuning" LED in this radio; newest (01-13-13) spectrometer software settings used. Spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 665nm and 675nm to pinpoint peak emission wavelength, which is 666.550nm.

The raw spectrometer data (tab-delimited that can be loaded into Excel) is at http://ledmuseum.candlepower.us/43/gp4l-t.txt

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.


ProMetric analysis
Beam cross-sectional analysis.

Image made using the ProMetric System by Radiant Imaging.



TEST NOTES:
Test unit was sent by N.C. of Countycomm on 02-18-05, and was received on 02-22-05.

Product was made in China. A product's country of origin really does matter to some people, which is why I mentioned it on this web page.


UPDATE: 08-13-05
I have decided to rate this product five stars and place it in The Trophy Case on this website.


UPDATE: 08-14-05
Well wouldn't you know it...just last night, I awarded this product five stars, and at approximately 6:30 this morning, I heard a radio playing, and it turned out to be THIS radio. I tried the switch, and it did not quiet the unit. So I removed one of the batteries for several hours, and when I replaced it, everything appeared to function correctly once more. So I'll keep an ear open for it to see if it malfunctions in this manner again.


UPDATE: 08-14-05
No, you aren't seeing things.
Yes, a same-day update.
It is just possible that I may have inadvertently set the alarm last night, and not realised it when I heard the radio playing this morning. Time to do a little experiment...BBS...
yup, that was it alright!!!
The switch that controls the radio/flashlight had no effect, just as it had no effect earlier this morning. So, no, there's nothing whatsoever wrong with my GP-4L!!!


UPDATE: 08-27-05
My housemate dropped his GP-4L radio from ~4 feet onto a wooden porch, and no damage was detected.
One person emailed me and said "Radios are made to be loved... not punished!", and I can assure you that this was COMPLETELY accidental!!!


UPDATE: 12-22-10
The product was used during a recent 21-hour electrical power failure.
First, I used it, then I let my sister use it once I got enough D cells to feed a large ghetto blaster.


UPDATE: 01-25-12
The product was given to my mother for her to use (for all of us to listen to in the house, actually; but she retained custody of it for the majority of the time) during a 4-day electrical power failure; despite it being on for at least 20 hours daily, I never once had to replace the batteries in it.





PROS:
Convenient - radio and flashlight in one package
Nice looking package - no need to hide it if guests visit
Appears reasonably durable as radios go


CONS:
None that I've yet found


    MANUFACTURER: Unknown
    PRODUCT TYPE: Transistor radio with built-in LED flashlight
    LAMP TYPE: 5mm white LED
    No. OF LAMPS: 1
    BEAM TYPE: Wide spot with soft fall-off at perimeter
    SWITCH TYPE: Slide switch on/off
    BEZEL: None
    BATTERY: 2xAA cells
    CURRENT CONSUMPTION: (Radio) 64.2mA, (LED) 24.2mA
    WATER- AND URANATION-RESISTANT: No
    SUBMERSIBLE: FOR CHRIST SAKES NOOOOO!!!
    ACCESSORIES: Earbud-type earphones, batteries
    WARRANTY: Unknown/not stated

    PRODUCT RATING:

    Star Rating





GP-4L Radio/Flashlight * http://www.kaitousa.com/







Do you manufacture or sell an LED flashlight, task light, utility light, or module of some kind? Want to see it tested by a real person, under real working conditions? Do you then want to see how your light did? If you have a sample available for this type of real-world, real-time testing, please contact me at ledmuseum@gmail.com.

Please visit this web page for contact information.

Unsolicited flashlights, LEDs, and other products appearing in the mail are welcome, and it will automatically be assumed that you sent it in order to have it tested and evaluated for this site.
Be sure to include contact info or your company website's URL so visitors here will know where to purchase your product.







This page is a frame from a website.
If you arrived on this page through an outside link,you can get the "full meal deal" by clicking here.