ISP Korea High Powered LEDs



International Systems Processing (ISP), High White, part # 10W4DHCB-H
Received on 12-22-03, tested on 08-19-08
This is a high powered phosphor white LED in a 10mm clear epoxy package. There is no flange on the base of the LED, so you'll want to be aware of that if you intend to install this lamp in a through-hole application.

This LED produces a very wide beam of approximately 120 (I think). It also produces a very smooth beam, without shadows, rings, or other nasty things (artifacts) in it. The color temperature is approximately 5,500K, which is a slightly coolish (bluish) white.


Measures exactly 4,000mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Test current was 70mA.
I do not yet have access to my variable voltage/current PSU following a very recent move, which is why this is not a 100mA test.
Remember, wider viewing angles ALWAYS mean lower mcd readings.


Spectrographic plot
Spectrographic analysis of this LED.
USB2000 spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.




International Systems Processing (ISP), 80mA 5mm White LED, part #JW43 HCA-H
Received on 10-26-04, tested on 11-04-04
This is a high-powered white LED in a water-clear 5mm epoxy case. The beam angle is advertised at 60 degrees.


Beam photograph on the test target.
Light has an icy cool blue tint; but not quite as blue as this photograph depicts.
Measures 10,620mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.
Test current was 83mA at a Vf of 3.45 volts.




International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered IR LED, part #20L1-H850-60
Received on 10-26-04, tested on 10-27-04
This is a very high-powered near-infrared (NIR) LED that has an advertised peak wavelength of 850nm, and produces a wide beam of 60 degrees. Maximum sustained drive current is 350mA, with proper heatsinking.


Here is the LED itself. It comes in a circular package; the LED itself is affixed to what I believe is a MCPCB (metal core printed circuit board) to help aid in heatsinking.

I am not equipped to measure power output at the wavelength this LED radiates at, so I am rather ill-equipped to say how much optical power this LED generates.
A dull cherry red glow is evident when this LED is energized. Most people should be able to see it, but a few may not.


Test current was 346mA at a Vf of 1.609 volts.
I was not able to get a photograph of this LED's beam on the test target, so this is one of the LED's "business-end" itself, while powered up at a drive current of 346mA.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High Green, part # 8G4DHCB-H
Received on 12-22-03, tested on 12-30-03
This LED produces a wide beam of approximately 45 degrees (I think). It also produces a very smooth beam, without shadows, rings, or other nasty things (artifacts) in it you might normally find in a clear-case pure green LED's beam. The dominant wavelength (where you would point to on a color chart) appears to be very near 525nm, in the lower range for these LEDs. The range is 520-540nm, according to the datasheet that was supplied with the test samples. My spectrometer is broken, so I can't actually measure this.

(Update 08-19-08: I now have ready access to a spectrometer, so the spectrographic analysis I wanted to perform has now been taken care of.

There is no flange on this or any of the other 8mm and 10mm "High LEDs" on this page, just so you know.


Measures 24,100mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Test current was 97mA
Remember, wider viewing angles always mean fewer mcd.

According to the data sheet that came with these samples, this LED typically radiates 19,000mcd at 100mA (0.10 amps). So this sample is just a bit brighter than the average run.


Spectrographic plot
Spectrographic analysis of this LED.
USB2000 spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High Yellow, part # 8Y4DHCB-H
Received on 12-22-03, tested on 12-30-03
This LED produces a wide beam of approximately 45 degrees (I think). It also produces a very smooth beam, without shadows, rings, or other nasty things (artifacts) in it you might normally find in a clear-case yellow LED's beam. The dominant wavelength (where you would point to on a color chart) appears to be very near 590nm, right at the upper range for these LEDs. The range is 580-590nm, according to the datasheet that was supplied with the test samples. My spectrometer is broken, so I can't actually measure this.

There is no flange on this or any of the other 8mm and 10mm "High LEDs" on this page, just so you know.


Measures 10,300mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Test current was 97mA
Remember, wider viewing angles always mean fewer mcd.
The color is much less reddish than this picture makes it appear.

According to the data sheet that came with these samples, this LED typically radiates 9,500mcd at 100mA (0.10 amps). So this sample is just a bit brighter than the average run. Less brighter than the red, but still a bit brighter.


Spectrographic plot
Spectrographic analysis of this LED.
USB2000 spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High Red, part # 8R4DHCB-H
Received on 12-22-03, tested on 12-30-03
This LED produces a wide beam of approximately 45 degrees (I think). It also produces a very smooth beam, without shadows, rings, or other nasty things (artifacts) in it. The dominant wavelength (where you would point to on a color chart) appears to be very near 630nm, right at the upper range for these LEDs. The range is 620-630nm, according to the datasheet that was supplied with the test samples. My spectrometer is broken, so I can't actually measure this.


Measures 11,600mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Test current was 97mA
Remember, wider viewing angles always mean fewer mcd.

According to the data sheet that came with these samples, this LED typically radiates 8,500mcd at 100mA (0.10 amps). So this sample is just a bit brighter than the average run.


Spectrographic plot
Spectrographic analysis of this LED.
USB2000 spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High Blue, part # 10B4DHCB-H
Received on 12-22-03, tested on 12-23-03
This is a high powered LED in a 10mm clear epoxy package. There is no flange on the base of the LED, so you'll want to be aware of that if you intend to install this lamp in a through-hole application.


Here is a picture of the LED itself, so ya know what it looks like. :-)
This LED produces a very wide beam of approximately 120 degrees (I think). It also produces a very smooth beam, without shadows, rings, or other nasty things (artifacts) in it. The dominant wavelength (where you would point to on a color chart) appears to be very near 470nm, right at the upper range for these LEDs. The range is 465-470nm, according to the datasheet that was supplied with the test samples.


Measures 1,590mcd on a Meterman LM631 light meter.
Test current was 90mA.
Remember, wider viewing angles ALWAYS mean lower mcd readings.


Spectrographic plot
Spectrographic analysis of this LED.
USB2000 spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered White, part # HW-350-60
Received and tested on 10-22-03
This is a high-powered white LED in a (for now) non-standard case and metal core PCB. It needs 350mA at 4.05 volts DC (open circuit measurement; may drop to 3.8 or 3.9 volts when this LED is added). The LED itself comes in a transparent epoxy resin package, and has a wide range of operating current, so you can tailor its light output for what you need the LED for.


This picture is of the actual LED.

See how the central LED part is mounted on a metal core PCB. I believe the (+) and (-) connections are isolated from the heatsinking portion, so you can bolt one of these LEDs onto a larger metal assembly (for heatsinking purposes, usually), and not have to worry that you may also be connecting the whole thing to the power supply, because you won't. Only the LED will be connected, not the entire chassis.


Test current was 354 milliamps.
Measures 13,570mcd with a 60 beam.
Color temperature appears to be right around 6,000K, which is right on for this device.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.

Like I did for the blue model of this LED, I used a Meterman LM631 light meter and an Energy One XP-4 power supply for these tests.

The beam is very smooth and ring-free. I don't know how it would perform with focusing optics though, as I was not provided with any, and I don't even know if these LEDs or a variant of them come with them.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered Blue, part # HB-350-60
Received and tested on 10-22-03
This is a high-powered blue LED in a (for now) non-standard case and metal core PCB. It needs 350mA at 4.05 volts DC (open circuit measurement; may drop to 3.8 or 3.9 volts when this LED is added). The LED itself comes in a transparent epoxy resin package, and has a wide range of operating current, so you can tailor its light output for what you need the LED for.


This picture is of the actual LED.

See how the central LED part is mounted on a metal core PCB. I believe the (+) and (-) connections are isolated from the heatsinking portion, so you can bolt one of these LEDs onto a larger metal assembly (for heatsinking purposes, usually), and not have to worry that you may also be connecting the whole thing to the power supply, because you won't. Only the LED will be connected, not the entire chassis.


Test current was 367 milliamps.
Measures 7,160mcd with a 60 beam.
Dominant wavelength appears to be right around 470nm, which is right on for this device.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.

I used a Meterman LM631 light meter and an Energy One XP-4 power supply for these tests.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered Green, part # HG-350-60
Received and tested on 10-22-03
This is a high-powered true green (InGaN) LED in a (for now) non-standard case and metal core PCB. It needs 350mA at 4.05 volts DC (open circuit measurement; may drop to 3.8 or 3.9 volts when this LED is added, like other InGaN LEDs might). The LED itself comes in a transparent epoxy resin package, and has a wide range of operating current, so you can tailor its light output for what you need the LED for.


This picture is of the actual LED.

See how the central LED part is mounted on a metal core PCB. I believe the (+) and (-) connections are isolated from the heatsinking portion, so you can bolt one of these LEDs onto a larger metal assembly (for heatsinking purposes, usually), and not have to worry that you may also be connecting the whole thing to the power supply, because you won't. Only the LED will be connected, not the entire chassis.


Test current was 392 milliamps.
Measures 40,700mcd with a 60 beam.
Dominant wavelength appears to be right around 525nm, which is right on for this device.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.

As with the other high powered ISP LEDs, I used a Meterman LM631 light meter and an Energy One XP-4 power supply for these tests.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered Yellow, part # HY-350-60
Received 10-22-03, tested 10-25-03
This is a high-powered yellow LED in a (for now) non-standard case and round metal core PCB. It needs 350mA at 2.4 or so volts DC (the power supply measured 3.29 volts open circuit, this probably drops a bit as the lamp is connected). The LED itself comes in a transparent epoxy resin package, and has a wide range of operating current, so you can tailor its light output for what you need the LED for.


This picture is of the actual LED.
(This is really a picture of the red, but the red and yellow look the same)

See how the central LED part is mounted on a metal core PCB. I believe the (+) and (-) connections are isolated from the heatsinking portion, so you can bolt one of these LEDs onto a larger metal assembly (for heatsinking purposes, usually), and not have to worry that you may also be connecting the whole thing to the power supply, because you won't. Only the LED will be connected, not the entire chassis.


The color is a lot less reddish than the picture shows.
Test current was 365-375 milliamps (it varied slightly).
Measures 17,500mcd with a 60 beam.
Dominant wavelength appears to be right around 585nm, which once again is right on target for this device.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.

As with the other high powered ISP LEDs, I used a Meterman LM631 light meter and an Energy One XP-4 power supply for these tests.



International Systems Processing (ISP), High-Powered Orangish-Red, part # HR-350-60
Received 10-22-03, tested 10-23-03
This is a high-powered orangish-red LED in a (for now) non-standard case and metal core PCB. It needs 350mA at 2.4 or so volts DC (the power supply measured 2.83 volts open circuit, this probably drops a bit as the lamp is connected). The LED itself comes in a transparent epoxy resin package, and has a wide range of operating current, so you can tailor its light output for what you need the LED for.


This picture is of the actual LED.

See how the central LED part is mounted on a metal core PCB. I believe the (+) and (-) connections are isolated from the heatsinking portion, so you can bolt one of these LEDs onto a larger metal assembly (for heatsinking purposes, usually), and not have to worry that you may also be connecting the whole thing to the power supply, because you won't. Only the LED will be connected, not the entire chassis.


Test current was 359 milliamps.
Measures exactly 10,000mcd with a 60 beam.
Dominant wavelength appears to be right around 625nm, which is right on for this device.
Remember, wider viewing angles always equal lower mcd values.

As with the other high powered ISP LEDs, I used a Meterman LM631 light meter and an Energy One XP-4 power supply for these tests.



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